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Amicalola Falls 40AB1217 State Park GA.tif

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Amicalola Falls State Park is an 829 acre Georgia state park located between Ellijay and Dahlonega in Dawsonville, Georgia. The park's name is derived from a Cherokee language word meaning "tumbling waters". The park is home to Amicalola Falls, a 729-foot waterfall, making it the highest in Georgia. It is considered to be one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia. An eight-mile trail that winds past Amicalola Falls and leads to Springer Mountain, famous for being the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail, begins in the park..The Chattahoochee National Forest is located in northern Georgia. The area of the Chattahoochee National Forest comprises 750,145 acres. The county with the largest portion of the forest is Rabun County, Georgia, which has 148,684 acres within its boundaries. The Chattahoochee National Forest takes its name from the Chattahoochee River whose headwaters begin in the North Georgia mountains. The River and the area were given the name by the English settlers who took the name from the Indians living here. The Cherokee and Creek Indians inhabited North Georgia.
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Ron Sherman
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Nature Scenes Atlanta, North Georgia Mountains
Amicalola Falls State Park is an 829 acre Georgia state park located between Ellijay and Dahlonega in Dawsonville, Georgia. The park's name is derived from a Cherokee language word meaning "tumbling waters". The park is home to Amicalola Falls, a 729-foot waterfall, making it the highest in Georgia. It is considered to be one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia. An eight-mile  trail that winds past Amicalola Falls and leads to Springer Mountain, famous for being the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail, begins in the park..The Chattahoochee National Forest is located in northern Georgia. The area of the Chattahoochee National Forest comprises 750,145 acres. The county with the largest portion of the forest is Rabun County, Georgia, which has 148,684 acres within its boundaries. The Chattahoochee National Forest takes its name from the Chattahoochee River whose headwaters begin in the North Georgia mountains. The River and the area were given the name by the English settlers who took the name from the Indians living here. The Cherokee and Creek Indians inhabited North Georgia.